Ask Career Services

This feature will be recurring with questions on career related topics, industry insight and our services.  If you have a question that you would like featured on this blog, please email cs@nyit.edu with the subject line “Ask Career Services.” 

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I attended the all majors career fair back in the spring and I didn’t find anything I wanted in terms of jobs.  What can I do to maximize my time at the next fair or event?

I often hear this from students when we ask for feedback about our events.  There is plenty one can do before a career fair to get the most out of it. I advise our students to take a couple of steps in order to prepare.

  • Review the list of employers that will be attending. Most will have their open positions posted on NYIT Career Net or on the company’s website.  If you have done your research ahead of time and see a job posted on a company’s website, but it’s not listed at the fair, ask the recruiter about it.  Perhaps they are looking to fill that position with someone who has more experience or they already have a candidate.  For a full list of employers that attend, students can download the NYIT Career Fair App from the App Store or Google Play.
  • If they don’t have a job that matches your experience and interests, it doesn’t hurt to ask about future opportunities. See if you can keep in touch in case something comes up in the future.
  • Practice your networking skills. If there is a company that you are interested in but there are no opportunities that are a right fit, ask the recruiter for their business card or if you can connect on LinkedIn.  Network with other attendees at the fair or event.  You may make a new connection and learn about other opportunities that weren’t right for them but may be a great match for you.

Keep these steps in mind during our career fairs this year including the R:EACT Career Fair on October 26th, at our Manhattan campus.

I get nervous when I go on interviews.  What should I do? 

It’s normal to get nervous when you’re on an interview.  You’re being asked a lot of questions about your experience and background, and there may be a lot riding on how you do.  I encourage job seekers to go on as many interviews as possible as you will learn about yourself and the interview process the more you do it.  It also helps to ease some of the anxiety as you gain interview experience.  Other tips to keep in mind,

  1. Be confident. Easier said than done; try to remember that you made it out of the applicant pool to an interview, which is already an accomplishment.  The hiring manager probably sees tons of resumes every week and you were selected because there was an interest in getting to know you a little better and finding out if this is the right fit.  Be confident in your abilities and candidacy for the position.
  2. Think about some of the questions you will be asked and how you will respond.  Practice talking about yourself, your education, and experience.  Know what your goals are and what you can bring to the team.  Schedule an appointment with Career Services for a mock interview and we can provide feedback and tips for your interview.
  3. Relax the night before. If you’ve done the work and preparation, you should relax and clear your head the night before the interview.  Cramming and feeding into the stress before the interview can make things worse and make you more anxious.  After you finish preparing, take some time for yourself with a book, listen to some music or whatever it takes to relax.

 

I submitted my resume for review and I was told one thing, but then when I met with someone else in your office, I was told something else.  Why is that?

Our career advisors provide feedback based on our experience working with job seekers, employers, recruiters, and our own personal experience in the working world as well.  We each have different styles on how to format a resume, write a cover letter, and approach to networking.  Our style may differ but we utilize the same best practices.  For example, one advisor may recommend using an objective on your resume as long as it’s clear and concise while another may want to leave it out altogether.  At the end of the day, we each provide feedback that we think will best help you with the job search process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Student Perspectives: Journey Since First Year by Hinali Shah

Student Perspectives provides an inside look to the career exploration and job search process from the student’s point of view.  This feature is written entirely by students who want to share their experiences to other students and industry professionals and provide feedback on our services and how we can assist them in their career planning.  

 

Journey Since First Year

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Architecture was an unfamiliar territory, even when I started architecture school.

Always having an interest in the arts, and having the ability to draw and paint, my parents suggested I consider the field of architecture as a possible career option. Being clueless about the real world, I took an architecture class during my senior year of high school, and I liked it. It didn’t teach me about the fundamentals,just how to use one of the popular programs. I liked designing my dream house as the final project, which made me decide to go for this career path.

My first semester at New York Institute of Technology was extremely difficult. I was thrown into a design class from day one, and realized that I didn’t truly have a basis of what architecture was. The knowledge I had from my high school class was not enough. I struggled that first semester, and during the winter break of 2014, I pushed myself to the extreme to understand and better my designing and model-making skills. I have continued to push myself for the past 4 years I have been in this school, which has helped me to love this field that I once found impossible. I’ve encountered some amazing mentors and have made steps to overcome my shy personality to ask for help and resources when needed.

When I started working as a student ambassador at Career Services in 2015, I met a lot of staff who encouraged me to participate in different activities on and off campus, which helped me develop leadership skills. Since I have been working there, I have helped organize many firm visits, curated an art show, and headed a voter registration contest. This responsibility also lead me to get more confident in the classroom. I was able to ask questions when I didn’t understand something and to take pride in my own work, which is a must in architecture. This past semester, I got an internship at a celebrated architecture magazine and during the spring break, I was able to travel to the Dominican Republic with 11 other students and help build a home for a woman in need. This happened because I made myself aware of what NYIT had to offer, whether it be academic, extracurricular, or experiential opportunities, and I was able to take action and participate.

For new students who are reading this, my advice to you is to join a club or get an on-campus job in your first year of school. It will help you get more connections and aid you in your transition from a high school to a college atmosphere. Also identify the areas in which you struggle, because there are tons of resources like peer tutoring, counselors in career services, volunteer organizations like the Community Service Center, financial aid office, etc., which can help you to break through your barriers or be there for you when needed.

 

 

Hinali Shah is a senior majoring in Bachelor of Architecture at New York Institute of Technology. She was born in India, but moved to the United States at the age of 13. Her passions include learning about cultural architecture, travelling, writing, and fashion styling. So far her favorite city apart from New York is Barcelona.